Which Language Has The Most Cases?

Which language has the most words?

EnglishIf we were to base our answer solely on the strict number of dictionary entries, English is among the largest languages by word count.

It has more than 200,000 words in the Oxford English Dictionary, including 171,476 words in use and 47,156 obsolete words..

Which language has the most complex grammar?

HungarianHungarian. Making the list with 26 cases, Hungarian has some of the most difficult grammar rules you’ll come across. In Hungarian, suffixes dictate tense and possession instead of the word order, which is how most European languages tackle the problem.

What languages have no cases?

Chinese (also mentioned in other answers) is the main example of a language with no morphological case at all (not even in pronouns), although other languages like some Austronesian languages are the same.

Is there a dative case in English?

English makes use of four “cases” – Nominative, Genitive, Accusative, and Dative. The term “case” applies to nouns and pronouns. … Another term for “Accusative” is ‘Objective.” A noun or pronoun is in the Dative Case when it is used as an indirect object.

Which language has the most noun cases?

Among modern languages, cases still feature prominently in most of the Balto-Slavic languages (except Macedonian and Bulgarian), with most having six to eight cases, as well as Icelandic, German and Modern Greek, which have four.

How many cases are in the English language?

three casesCase refers to the form a word takes and its function in a sentence. The English language has just three cases: subjective, possessive and objective. Most nouns, many indefinite pronouns and “it” and“you” have distinctive forms only for the possessive case.

What are the hardest languages to learn?

The Hardest Languages For English SpeakersMandarin Chinese. Interestingly, the hardest language to learn is also the most widely spoken native language in the world. … Arabic. … Polish. … Russian. … Turkish. … Danish.

Why doesn’t English have cases?

… hence, the entire inflectional system may become abandoned due to its incomplete usefulness. English has not lost its cases completely yet. The distinction between nominative, oblique case (result of the merger of accusative and dative) and genitive has survived in the personal pronouns, e.g. he / him / his.

What are Russian cases?

There are six cases in Russian: nominative, genitive, dative, accusative, instrumental, and prepositional.